Relative Clauses 6

Index

Complete the sentences using the words in bold. Use two to five words. Put in commas where necessary.

1) She has two watches. She bought one of them in Paris. The one is faulty.
THAT
The watch
is faulty.
2) My sister has a lot of friends. None of them are married.
WHOM
My sister has a lot of friends,
married.
3) Their dog is called Ben. They've had it for ten years.
WHICH
Their dog,
for ten years, is called Ben.
4) A chemist's is a shop that sales medicines.
YOU
A chemist's is a shop
medicines.
5) This is the woman. We borrowed the car from her.
WHOM
This is the woman
the car.
6) Carol decided to leave our town. Her daughter had been killed.
WHOSE
Carol,
, decided to leave our town.
7) All visitor to the museum are asked to sign the visitors book.
VISITS
Everyone
asked to sign the visitors book.
8) She has chosen a CD with a broken cover.
WHOSE
She has chosen a CD
broken.

Test Answers!

englishrevealed

CORRECT!

That is used after a noun as a relative pronoun like who, whom, or which to introduce a clause. In defining relative clauses, who, which, whom can be replaced with that.

HINT!

We've got a defining relative clause. Them must be replaced with that in this sentence.

CORRECT!

A quantity phrase with whom is placed at the front of the modifying clause and then the clause is placed directly after the noun it modifies.

HINT!

When we want to add information about a particular number of things or people we can use all, both, each, none, neither etc. + of which or of whom!

CORRECT!

Which is often used, after a comma in writing, to add more information about the thing, situation, or event you have just mentioned. In non-defining clauses, you cannot use that instead of who, whom or which.

CORRECT!

Which is often used, after a comma in writing, to add more information about the thing, situation, or event you have just mentioned. In non-defining clauses, you cannot use that instead of who, whom or which.

HINT!

Remember that which replaces it in this sentence!

CORRECT!

Where is often used as a relative pronoun. Where means in or to which place. In formal English, a phrase with preposition + which (at which, in which) can often be used instead.

CORRECT!

Where is often used as a relative pronoun. Where means in or to which place. In formal English, a phrase with preposition + which (at which, in which) can often be used instead.

HINT!

In which means where. In formal English, a phrase with preposition + which (at which, in which) can often be used instead of where.

CORRECT!

Preposition + whom. In formal or written English, the preposition is often placed before the relative pronoun, and in this case the pronoun cannot be omitted. Notice that after a preposition you can\'t use who instead of whom.

HINT!

Do not forget to place the preposition before whom!

CORRECT!

Whose is a possessive pronoun like his, her and our. We use whose to find out which person something belongs to.
Do not confuse whose with who\'s.

HINT!

Whose replaces her in this sentence.

CORRECT!

Who is a relative pronoun used after a noun or pronoun to show which group of people you are talking about. Use who when a sentence requires a subject pronoun (equivalent to he or she). In defining clauses, you can use that instead of who, whom or which.

CORRECT!

Who is a relative pronoun used after a noun or pronoun to show which group of people you are talking about. Use who when a sentence requires a subject pronoun (equivalent to he or she). In defining clauses, you can use that instead of who, whom or which.

HINT!

Does everyone take a singular or plural verb?

CORRECT!

Whose is a possessive pronoun like his, her and our. We use whose to find out which person something belongs to. Do not confuse whose with who\'s. We can also use whose when we are talking about things.

HINT!

Whose can be sometimes used to talk about things!

WARNING!

TURN OFF YOUR CAPSLOCK!